Tag Archive: CSTPR

The List: Science and Environment Happenings in and Around Boulder

Solar Probe. (Photo/NASA)

Events this week will discuss the relationship between extreme weather events and climate, and the 2018 NASA mission that will send a spacecraft closer to the sun than ever before.  There will be a viewing of the HBO documentary “Too Hot Not to Handle,” followed by a discussion and reception with Susan Joy Hassol, the movie’s writer, on the CU Boulder campus.

“Challenges in Attribution of Weather and Climate Extremes,” hosted by the Center for Science and Technology Policy Research (CSTPR). April 30.
What? Randall Dole, the seminar’s speaker, is deputy director for research in the Physical Sciences Division of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Earth System Research Laboratory in Boulder.  He holds a doctorate in meteorology from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Dole’s research emphasizes the connections between weather and climate.  His published studies encompass phenomena associated with weather and climate extremes, including droughts, heat waves, tornadoes and extratropical cyclones.  Dole has served on numerous high-level service roles relevant to weather and climate, and he was one of the three scientific experts on the U.S. delegation for the IPCC Working Group I Fourth Assessment Report, “Climate Change 2007: The Physical Science Basis.”
Where? CSTPR Conference Room. Map
Time? 12:00 p.m. – 1:00 p.m.
Cost? Free
Website

“Solar Probe and the Solar Wind: The First Mission to our Nearest Star,” hosted by the Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics (LASP). May 2.
What? LASP researcher David Malaspina will discuss the Solar Probe+ mission to study the sun.  This mission will send a spacecraft closer to the sun than ever before with the goal of answering a fundamental question: “How does the sun interact with the solar system?”  By repeatedly sampling the near-sun environment, the Solar Probe+ will answer other questions that have been ranked as top priorities by heliophysicists for decades, such as the origin and evolution of solar wind and the kind of interplanetary dust close to the sun.  The seminar will also describe the Solar Probe+ itself, including its scientific instruments and challenges to its survival, such as temperatures of up to 2,600 Fahrenheit.
Where? LASP Space Technology Building (LSTB)-299, Auditorium. Directions
Time? 7:30 p.m. – 8:30 p.m.
Cost? Free
Website

“Viewing of HBO’s Documentary: ‘Too Hot Not to Handle,’” hosted by the Forum on Science Ethics & Policy (FOSEP). May 2.
What? HBO’s 2006 documentary shows Americans experiencing climate change impacts and features leading scientists explaining these changes.  The second half of the films is devoted to solutions available now to help address the climate challenge.  The viewing will be followed by a discussion and reception with the movie’s writer Susan Joy Hassol. Hassol is the Director of Climate Communication, based in Boulder, Colorado.  She’s worked for over 20 years to communicate the science of climate change to policy makers, the media and the public.
Where? CU Boulder, Eaton Humanities, room 250. Map
Time? 5:30 p.m.
Cost? Free
Website

The List: Science and Environment Happenings in and Around Boulder

This week CU Boulder is hosting the 64th Annual Conference on World Affairs that includes environment and science panels, such as a discussion on the role of practitioners at the science-society interface and a documentary that explores the question,“How do we become a sustainable civilization?”

Updates on the first spacecraft to orbit Mercury, the innermost planet of our solar system, as well as local governments and approaches to achieving sustainability will also be addressed this week.

“64th Annual Conference on World Affairs.” April 9 – 13.
What? The Conference on World Affairs brings 100 speakers and performers from across and the country and around the globe to present 200 cross-disciplinary panels, plenary sessions and performances.  Founded in 1948 as a forum on international affairs, the event has expanded to include science, environment, as well as the arts, media, diplomacy, technology, spirituality, politics, business, medicine, human rights and more.
Where? CU-Boulder campus
Time? See schedule for list of events and times
Cost? All events are free and open to the public
Website

“Wag the Dog: Ethics, Accuracy and Impact of the Science on Extremes in Political Debates,” hosted by the Center for Science and Technology Policy Research (CSTPR). This is a concurrent event with the 64th Conference on World Affairs at the University of Colorado. April 9.
What? In the 1997 movie “Wag the Dog” a political operative and movie producer stage a war to cover up a presidential sex scandal.  One of the characters exclaims, “What difference does it make if it’s true? If it’s a story and it breaks, they’re gonna run with it.” At the interface of science and the broader society of which it’s part, traditional roles are blurred, especially with the rise of new media.  Scientists may act like journalists and journalists make judgments about science.  Are there norms or guidelines for practitioners at the science-society interface?  This seminar won’t necessarily provide answers, but it will cover a range of examples from different contexts to stimulate discussion and debate.
The speaker Roger Pielke Jr. is serving on the National Research Council Committee on Responsible Research.  This committee is tasked with updating guidelines for scientists last proposed in 1992.  Pielke is a professor in the Environmental Studies Program at CU Boulder and a fellow of the Cooperative Institute for Research in the Environmental Sciences (CIRES).
Where? CIRES auditorium, CU-Boulder. Map
Time? 12:00 p.m. – 1:00 p.m.
Cost? Free
Website

Hooked on Growth director Dave Gardner offers his talents to convey his message. (Photo/growthbusters.org)

“Growthbusters film screening and discussion with producer Dave Gardner,” hosted by CU-Boulder’s Environmental Center. This is a concurrent event with the 64th Conference on World Affairs at the University of Colorado.  April 9.
What? This feature-length documentary examines the culture barriers preventing the human race from acting upon the knowledge that current levels of population and consumption are unsustainable. A discussion with film producer Dave Gardner and with Dr. Al Bartlett will follow the viewing.
Dr. Al Bartlett is Professor Emeritus in Nuclear Physics at the University of Colorado at Boulder and has been a member of the faculty of the University of Colorado since 1950. He’s presented his celebrated lecture, Arithmetic, Population and Energy over 1,600 times.
Where? CU-Boulder, Humanities Room 250. Map
Time? 6:00 p.m. – 9:00 p.m.
Cost? Free
Watch the trailer

“Geology of Mercury from MESSENGER,” hosted by JILA, a joint institute of CU Boulder and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST).” April 9.   
What? Louise Prockter, a planetary scientist at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory  (APL) in Laurel, Md., will lead the colloquium.  Prockter heads up a small team dedicated to ensuring the images acquired at Mercury — from the dual imaging system onboard the MESSENGER spacecraft — will enable fundamental science questions to be addressed.
NASA’s MESSENGER spacecraft went into orbit around the innermost planet of our solar system in March 2011. The spacecraft Mariner 10, launched in 1973, also visited Mercury, but MESSENGER is the first and only spacecraft to orbit the planet.
Where? JILA auditorium. Map
Time? 4:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.
Cost? Free
Website

“Sustainability for Local Governments,” hosted by CU Boulder’s Sustainable Practices Program. April 13.
What? How do local governments get on a sustainable track?  This course covers a brief scientific overview of climate change, how to develop a baseline assessment for a municipality, and indicators municipalities can use to track progress. The case study reviews include: Aspen, Albuquerque, Boulder, Chicago, Fort Collins and Portland.
Where? CU Boulder
Time? 9:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.
Cost? General participants – $355. CU Boulder students – $177.50. CU Boulder Faculty/Staff – $284.00
Register here

The List: Science and Environmental Happenings in and Around Boulder

by Marisa McNatt

This week, Boulder will be addressing improvements in extreme rainfall predictions and how the Greenland ice sheet is affected by global warming.  At the Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics, an evening lecture will discuss findings related to Venus and its atmosphere. A course that explores energy policies, with a focus on policies and renewable energy at the U.S. national level, is offered this week at CU-Boulder.

Venus in visible UV (Photo/LASP)

“Making Climate Change Local: High-resolution Downscaling of Extreme Precipitation Projections in the Colorado Front Range,” hosted by the Center for Science and Technology Policy Research (CSTPR). April 2.
What? Extreme rainfall events present numerous challenges and questions related to public safety and risk management. By improving climate model projections at the regional level, scientists and researchers are creating a more realistic picture of future flood risk across central and Eastern Colorado. This research’s main objective is to better inform the needs of water resources mangers in the Western U.S. Kelly Mahoney, a CIRES Research Scientist working at the National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration Earth System Research Laboratory, will lead the seminar.  Mahoney is currently working on extreme precipitation forecasting in shorter time scales across various regions of the U.S.
Where? CSTPR Conference Room. Map
Time? 12:00 p.m. – 1:00 p.m.
Cost? Free
Website

“Transits and Observations of Venus,” hosted by the Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics (LASP). April 4.
What? LASP scientist Dr. Kevin McGouldrick will discuss findings related to Venus and its atmosphere.  Check the LASP calendar for details to come.
Where? LASP Space Technology Building (LSTB)-299, Auditorium. Map and directions.
Time? 7:30 p.m. (doors open at 7:00 p.m.)
Cost? Free
Website

“Greenland ice sheet and dynamic response to global warming,” hosted by CU-Boulder’s Geography Department. April 6.
What? Konrad Steffen, Director of the Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences and Professor in CU-Boulder’s Geography Department, will lead the colloquium. Steffen studies interactions between climate and crysophere — water water in its’ solid form. Specifically, Steffen studies in Greenland and Antarctica, addressing the response of ice sheets to climate warming and resulting sea level rise, using past, present and future climate variability and trends that are based on direct measurements, satellite measurements, as well as climate modeling.
Where? CU-Boulder, IBS Building, room 155. Map.
Time? 3:30 p.m.
Cost? Free
Website

“Energy Legislation and Policy Analysis,” hosted by CU-Boulder’s Sustainable Practices Program. April 6.
What? New policies related to renewable energy and traditional energy can directly impact the bottom line of sustainably minded businesses.  This course will provide students with knowledge, research techniques and resources to track developing policies and legislation and how these policies and legislation affect business. The course focuses on renewable energy, but also examines other major current forms of energy and the policies that boost and discourage their use.  Trade groups, lobbying entities and the legislative process will be addressed to foster understanding of how legislation and policies are developed.  In addition to the U.S. national level, this course looks into interesting and innovative policies at the local, state and international level as well.
Where? CU-Boulder
Time? 9:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.
Cost? General participants – $355. CU-Boulder students – $177.50. CU-Boulder Faculty/Staff – $284.00
Register here

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