Category Archive: Climate

Climate Change Casualty: What the ski industry stands to lose

As the precipitation season wound to a close in April 2013, the Dillon Reservoir in the heart of Summit County was still only at 65 percent capacity. It did not recover until the heavy rains and flooding of September 2013.  (Photo/Christi Turner)

As the precipitation season wound to a close in April 2013, the Dillon Reservoir in the heart of Summit County was still only at 65 percent capacity. It did not recover until the heavy rains and flooding of September 2013. (Photo/Christi Turner)

By Kendall Brunette

Some people call them podunk.  Some call them money pits in a one-horse town.  Whatever you call them, small, rural ski resorts across the country are struggling.

Stuart Thompson has worked in the ski business since the 1960s.  He’s held every job from ski patrol to avalanche control.  Most recently, Thompson ran White Pine Ski Area in the rural town of Pinedale, Wyo. – a mere dot on the map.

The U.S. Forest Service gave Thompson a permit to build what is now White Pine in 1988.  It took 10 years to develop the resort to the point of selling tickets.  In his slow Wyoming accent, Thompson described the tumultuous years he ran the resort.  Facing drought, reduced snowfall, a small customer population and limited reputation, Thompson struggled to keep the resort in business.

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Changing the Game: Boulder’s Clean Energy Goals, and How a Lego Game Shows How To Reach Them

In Changing the Game, players use Legos and change cards to turn a traditional energy system into the most energy-efficient system possible. (Photo/Marisa McNatt)

In Changing the Game, Alexander Ebuart, Albert Grau-Ivern and Julia Chozas use Legos and change cards to turn a traditional energy system into the most energy-efficient system possible. (Photo/Marisa McNatt)

Editor’s Note: Marisa McNatt researched information for this story while traveling in Copenhagen, Denmark as part of the Heinrich Böll Foundation’s Climate Media Fellowship program.

What if there were a way for Boulder to visualize what would happen if the city were to take more aggressive action for reducing carbon emissions, or to map what it would look like to meet its renewable energy targets through municipalization? Lego blocks and “Change Cards” provide just such a tool, offering insight into the technological, economic and political challenges to making Boulder’s clean-energy and carbon-reducing visions a reality.

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In Autumn Rain Clouds, Silver Lining for Winter

(Image/Rocky Mountain Geographic Area Coordination Center)

(Image/Rocky Mountain Geographic Area Coordination Center)

One year ago today, a wildfire ignited near the Fern Lake trail head in Rocky Mountain National Park when careless hikers failed to extinguish their illegal campfire. Although October generally falls outside of the “fire season” in Colorado, 2012 had already been a record year for drought and wildfire, and the landscape was exceedingly dry and vulnerable to a spark. This autumn fire set off alarm bells for fire managers and climatologists, burning into the winter, growing by three miles in 35 minutes in December and smoldering under the snow long into the springtime. Finally, on June 25, 2013 officials declared the fire out, but warned that if conditions did not change, Coloradans could expect more anomalous, overwintering, long-burning, smoldering wildfires.

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